To 'say a good word ' is to repeat a prayer or Bible text, or to invoke the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost to ward off evil influences. our church community. This website was created to make some of these posts easily accessible and for people to learn about and enjoy our wonderful heritage. Early Anglo-Manx contained words of Gaelic and Norse origin, but also came to be influenced by the speech of Liverpool and Lancashire in North West England. If you, or someone you know, is concerned that a child or vulnerable adult is at risk or has been harmed, or are concerned about the behaviour of someone towards children or vulnerable adults, please contact our on-Island Ecumencial Safeguarding Advisor, Tony Connell on … Saint Brandon of Man (Manx: Braddan ny Mannin), also referred to as Brandinus, or Brendinus was Bishop of Man until approximately 1025 CE. Common words and phrases in Anglo-Manx originating in the language include: tholtan (the "th" is pronounced as a "t") meaning a ruined farmhouse, qualtagh meaning a first-foot, keeil meaning a church (especially an old one), cammag, traa-dy-liooar meaning "time enough", and tynwald (tinvaal), which is ultimately of Norse origin, but comes via Manx. As Manx as the Hills started in 2013 on facebook as a way for Bernadette Weyde to share her love of Manx history and folklore. Moore noted that the dialect varied slightly from parish to parish but that the same turns of phrase and the same stock of words pervaded the whole Island. One of the early Keeils (a Manx Gaelic word for a church), St Adamnan's Church is on the site of an earlier keeill dating from the 5th century. Moore noted that the dialect varied slightly from parish to parish but that the same turns of phrase and the same stock of words pervaded the whole Island. As Manx as the Hills started in 2013 on facebook as a way for Bernadette Weyde to share her love of Manx history and folklore. Kirk Arbory is the only church in which Manx is regularly … The word for the Church itself, agglish, is from ecclesia; a church (building) being chiamble or teamzbyl, from templum; and a chapel, cabbal, from the Middle Latin cappella. Indeed, I heard but little Manx talked during my stay in the Island, excepting when done for my edification, though the English of many of the old people showed plainly that they must be more at home in Manx. Often simply referred to as "Lonan Old Church" it was originally known in Manx as Keeill ny-Traie, or "the chapel by the shore" and is on the eastern side of the Island. This website was created to make some of these posts easily accessible and for people to learn about and enjoy our wonderful heritage. This website was created to make some of these posts easily accessible and for people to learn about and enjoy our wonderful heritage. The Manx historian and linguist A.W. " The charmer 'said the word ' two or three times, but the blood would not stop " ; " He then ' said the word ' over the cut herbs " (Clague, Manx Reminiscences, pages 125, 127). The Manx historian and linguist A.W. A.W. Common words and phrases in Anglo-Manx originating in the language include: "tholtan" (the "th" is pronounced as "t") meaning a ruined farmhouse, qualtagh meaning a first-foot, keeil meaning a church (especially an old one), cammag, traa-dy-liooar meaning "time enough", and tynwald (tinvaal), which is ultimately of Norse origin, but comes via Manx. As Manx as the Hills started in 2013 on facebook as a way for Bernadette Weyde to share her love of Manx history and folklore. Early Anglo-Manx contained words of Gaelic and Norse origin, but also came to be influenced by the speech of Liverpool and Lancashire in North West England. By far the greater number of the Manx words derived from Latin are connected with religion.